Making Sense of All That Data

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

In my last blog I mentioned that Big Data has progressed far beyond just being a business buzzword. There are entire industries being shaken to their core because a leading player finds a way to analyse their customers better than their rivals. Far from being a management trend, this is a strategy that will fundamentally change many industries.

But have you ever stopped to appreciate just how much data we are creating today?

Some excellent analysis in Business Insider recently explored this question. The problem is that people and companies are just creating so much data – it is increasing at an exponential rate. At the present rate we are doubling the amount of digital data that exists every two years.

But even though we are creating and storing these enormous amounts of data, only 0.5% of it is being analysed. There is so much data out there that companies, governments, and individuals feel swamped, unable to gain insights from it.

The Business Insider article features a comment that cuts to the heart of the Big Data issue: “You have to start with a question and not with the data,” says Andreas Weigend, former Chief Scientist of Amazon, now director of the Social Data Lab and lecturer at UC Berkeley.
Businesses need to start thinking about the insights they could get from their customers, to ask more ‘what-if’ questions. There are solutions out there in the data, but it is impossible to analyse every byte of data.

A typical analogy for the average person might be the difference between email and Twitter. You check every email, even if it is only long enough to decide that it should be deleted. However, you only check Twitter messages that are arriving as you are looking at the news stream, or you use intelligent filters and analysis to ensure that interesting messages are made visible.

Businesses need to start thinking of their Big Data strategy in the same way. How can insights be drawn out from the data they already have?

Big Data Means Big Business

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

Big Data is still just a buzzword for many people. Magazines and newspapers that do not cater strictly to a business audience continually need to explain what they mean when talking about the subject and the strong association with technology means that even some business leaders are still unaware of the true benefits.

But as with all technology projects and ideas, if they can be associated with actions that can improve a business, make it more efficient, deliver services faster, or create new products before competitors, then the leaders can see the advantage.

Forbes magazine recently documents a few examples that demonstrate some of the advantages. Carnival Cruises needs to plan the best way to serve passengers in much the same way as an airline does. However a cruise is a much longer journey than a flight and across all their ships and passengers, Carnival has 80 million cruise days per year. If they could just earn $1 per day extra from each passenger then that’s an immediate $80m boost to revenue.

That’s an example of how to analyse customer behaviour so products and services can be targeted more effectively. Retailers still do this with loyalty cards, although the idea of a loyalty card has been falling from fashion in recent years – customers are tired of giving away their personal data in return for very small benefits.

But data can also help to save money and improve service too. The Australian telco Telstra uses Big Data analysis on their entire network with predictive analysis so potential faults on lines, and in specific areas, can be identified before they happen. Outage time is reduced, engineers can be moved into position faster, and not only does the company save on maintenance, but the customer is happier too.

Every big business uses data today. Every business has the opportunity to analyse this data in a more effective way. There is always information available if you know how to dig deep into the data you have.

Business Intelligence is Being Led by Data Intelligence

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

The analyst firm Gartner recently published some fascinating data trends in Forbes magazine. They summarised how important Big Data is becoming for business intelligence in three clear trends:

1. By 2020, information will be used to reinvent, digitalize or eliminate 80% of business processes and products from a decade earlier.

2. By 2017, more than 30% of enterprise access to broadly based big data will be via intermediary data broker services, serving context to business decisions.

3. By 2017, more than 20% of customer-facing analytic deployments will provide product tracking information leveraging the IoT.

These trends are exciting because what they point to is how communication is changing between individuals and how this is now affecting the way that companies do business.

Mobile, social, cloud, and shared information are all forces that have really only grown in importance over the past 5-6 years. Many company leaders have not realised how all these factors will change the way that companies do business and how decisions from new products to choosing a partner company will all be data-led.

The Gartner predictions are point at corporate behaviours just 18 months in the future. Have you explored how your own organisation is using data today and if not then can you be sure that your competitors will not be making better business decisions a year from now?

Outsourcing Trends Becoming Important in 2015

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

I was recently asked about the classic price vs service argument by a consultant who advises on IT outsourcing. I replied that I am surprised there is still a debate over this. You can compare IT supplier based on the quality of what they do and then compare equally competent suppliers on price, but price is not a primary variable that should be used to compare companies.

After all, if the service delivered does not work then how much have you saved? The price debate reminds me of where IT outsourcing was a decade ago – it was surprising to be asked about this in 2015 when most organisations have a far more mature approach to finding expert partners.

I looked at CIO magazine to see what they considered the key trends in IT outsourcing would be this year. They published a good summary at the beginning of the year and never once mentioned that price would be an important comparison point.

Several of the trends they identified are very important though and I don’t feel that they are being given enough focus in the business and technology media:

1. A focus on outcomes: outcome based pricing has been around for years, but is often focused on BPO outsourcing where specific business processes can be priced. A focus on the outcome rather than process of delivering IT will be how many projects are charged in future.

2. The business ordering direct. The CIO used to manage all information systems, but now the business units are doing far more ordering direct because many solutions can be delivered using apps or the cloud, therefore not impacting on the infrastructure managed by the CIO. This means that suppliers need to develop new relationships and change their sales strategy.

3. Analytics taking over. In areas such as CRM and customer service technology systems data is all that matters now. This approach to data-led decision-making is affecting many business functions including the more creative ones such as sales and marketing.

The IT outsourcing trends are changing and developing as the IT services space develops, but sometimes it seems that the advisors cannot escape some of the old debates.

Are Social Networks Becoming The Infrastructure Of Industry?

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

Social networks have evolved rapidly over the past few years. In the last decade tools like Myspace were primarily used for sharing pictures and messages with friends – the social aspect of the network was the primary reason to use it. Facebook took over and sharing cat videos remained an extremely popular pastime.

But now companies are using these same networks to interact with customers. Brands got used to watching out for content on blogs and then the review sites, as well as tweets and Facebook. The past half a decade or so has seen an enormous change in the way that corporate and customer relationships work and it looks like Facebook may be about to define the next wave of change.

The Facebook Messenger app has been around for a few years now. It’s a useful tool for keeping in touch with friends and in many ways removes the need to know the phone number of your friends because messages are all relayed through the Facebook system – even though the app functions entirely separately from the main Facebook app.

A new development called “Business on Messenger” is aimed at making the app a hub for customers and companies. Companies will be able to take orders on Messenger, send out order confirmations, send shipping status updates, track deliveries and customers will be able to directly send questions to sellers.

All this functionality will be offered to companies to use in a flexible way that works best for their business. For the customer these developments are welcome. Facebook is encouraging developers to build new apps around the messenger API so it looks like companies will be able to create a complete customer messaging system using the building blocks Facebook makes available.

In some markets the WhatsApp messenger has already become an important tool for brands to talk with customers – and Facebook already owns that app. I fully expect the two messenger services to be blended at some point, with the addition of all these added features that will make this a real hub for customers interacting with companies.

Will companies buy into the service from Facebook? I expect that they will because to build this infrastructure internally is very expensive. The end result is that companies will be able to get a very low cost customer management system, but it will mean that more customers will be tied into using Facebook – whether they want to or not.

Will Social Networking Transform Customer Loyalty?

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

In my last blog, I mentioned that social networking technologies are changing how many companies use CRM. Opportunities are created to have a much deeper relationship with customers than was ever possible before and this goes far beyond just CRM alone.

But what is it that any company really wants? Why do they invest in all these technologies in the first place? There are many reasons, such as improving the customer experience, but possibly the most important is to generate customer loyalty. It costs far more to attract new customers to your business than to just keep the existing ones happy, so managing loyalty is important.

And as customers we all know about loyalty schemes. You probably have loyalty cards for your favourite hotel chain, airline, coffee store, bookstore, and supermarket. Every type of business tries giving away points and prizes to encourage loyalty.

The problem is that academics now believe that our present focus on loyalty through loyalty programmes doesn’t work very well. Take airlines for example. There are really only three major airline alliances, Star Alliance, One World, and SkyTeam. Serious business travellers just take a membership with all of them so they always collect points regardless of the airline used.

Most people use the supermarket that is closest to their home rather than travelling much further because they have a loyalty card from another store. Most of the time these loyalty cards don’t really create very much brand loyalty.

Smart companies today are looking at their CRM data and using a ‘buzz monitoring’ platform to analyse the social networks and then interacting with customers based on the information they can glean from the customer behaviour data. In effect, what is happening is that companies who know their customers well are able to use the data to create customer loyalty gifts and rewards that are targeted at the individual customer – not just points that every customer earns.

This is a big change in behaviour for many companies and it will be the back office technology that drives the information for this to work, but it is a natural shift. Customers have greater expectations on brands today and the first time a brand responds and rewards you in a unique and individual way will create a ‘wow’ moment for many customers.

It is these interactions based on data that will drive customer loyalty in future, not loyalty cards. Has any major brand ever rewarded you based on their knowledge of behaviour and how did that make you feel?

Mixing Social Networking with CRM

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

Social media is maturing and becoming an important part of the supply chain for many businesses. In areas like the media it is clearly a strong communication channel between content creators and their customers, but in other industries there has been an even deeper use of the technologies.

Take retail as a good example. For decades retailers have combined loyalty cards with CRM technologies to try predicting customer behaviour and to drive loyalty to certain products. There are many examples of retailers knowing individual customers better than their own family because of the data collected during their shopping trips.

A famous example is the US retailer Target sending discount coupons for products a new mother might want to a teenage girl. Her father was outraged, but he apologised to the retailer when his daughter confessed that she was in fact pregnant. The CRM system knew it before the father.

But traditional CRM has always relied on actual purchases and visits to the store. There had to be an actual interaction with a retailer to generate data that could then be analysed. With social networks and social media uploads customers provide information on their likes, desires, and preferences without even visiting the store.

This is a fantastic opportunity for retailers who can integrate social channels into their existing CRM. In addition to actual purchases, discounts and offers can be tailored to include preferences and the general sentiment of an entire group of customers.

It does require a different approach. Some kind of community management is usually needed for the retailer areas – such as the corporate Facebook page – and new software capable of ‘buzz monitoring’ other areas of the Internet has to be applied. But the opportunity for retailers of knowing their customers even better through the use of better technology systems is clear.

The same opportunity exists across all sectors – try searching for online discussions about your company name or products today. I’m sure you will find people talking about them. Now the question is, are they saying good things and if not, what do you do next to engage those customers?

Are you engaging with customers using social networking and how different is this data-driven approach to the old idea of a customer service team?

When Will CRM Finally Work Properly?

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

Companies such as banks have complained for years that their Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system doesn’t really work. The systems are expensive and yet they rarely return what was promised when the sales team demonstrated what could be achieved.

But I think that often, the real point of CRM has been lost somewhere between the software company sales pitch, the implementation, and the end user trying to make sense of how the system operates. A recent article in The Financial Brand magazine lists 6 important reasons why you should be reconsidering CRM. The first reason asks these questions:

“How will the data in the CRM benefit my customer?”
“How can I use this to speed up our process, to benefit my customer?”
“What events could be triggered using this data to help my customer?”
“Is there info that can be gained from the data that would help me do what is best for my customer.”
“How can my sales team best use the data to identify opportunities to help my customer?”

I entirely support this view. If the CRM system is not entirely focused on planning how processes and data can benefit the customer then there is no value in the system.

I would go further and argue that with the abilities we now have, CRM expectations should be much higher. Think of your mobile phone company as a good example. They probably offer you a monthly tariff on a fixed contract that offers a certain amount of minutes talk-time, texts, and Internet access.

But if you use too much Internet time or talk too much the customer usually gets hit with penalties – or very high per minute costs.

Yet, why would any company want to do this to a customer? You want to help the customer, not hit them with penalties surely? Why not use the data that you have on how this customer behaves – how many minutes they use on average each month, how much Internet data they use – and offer a special tariff designed just for that individual customer?
We have the Big Data expertise to do this and the CRM systems, but there has rarely been a connection between the data and how it can truly help the customer. For companies that want to succeed today, this has to change.

Find Business Everywhere

IBA Gomel
Iryna Zhurava

Keeping log of business relationships is not only the concern of a salesperson but also of everyone who has to work with clients, vendors or suppliers. It is not a newsflash that with the evolved technology there is no more need for long paper forms, notebooks, and business card holders and everything can be stored in a mobile device.

People from different divisions within IBA Group were looking for a mobile application that is easy to use, can store safely business information of a contact person and a summary of the conversation, can get more information about the interlocutor’s company form social media, can be useful in one-on-one meetings and trade fairs, and has other advantages. There are mobile applications that do that stuff, but not all of them together.

Our developers took the challenge and came up with a mobile application for iPhone and iPad called Marketing Application for Leads at Events (IBA.MALE). This application provides a solution for the following requirements:

• Use at events: upload a list of possible persons who will be at that event
• Capture and store interlocutor’s business information:

o by scanning of a business card and recognition of the text on it
o by scanning and recognition of a barcode or QR code and matching these with the person’s data in the pre-uploaded list
o by manual entry of information

• Receive online information on interlocutor’s company. The application allows for retrieving information on the contact person from LinkedIn online. It takes less than a minute
• Log the conversation summary
• Easy search of contacts by name, title, location or interests
• Export of contacts via email or Bluetooth.

With an existing free version of the application IBA.MALE Light you can check most capabilities of the application and decide whether to buy a full version of the application.

The Big Picture on Customer Service, CRM, and Big Data

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

Last month I was in London, invited to speak at an event hosted by the IBA Group. The theme of the event was the resurgence of CRM and how it is being combined with Big Data and becoming an important part of corporate strategy today – particularly for companies planning how to improve their customer service.

The analyst Peter Ryan from Ovum was up before me. He talked about the strategic use of CRM and how the improved use of information feeds into a customer service strategy. Ovum has predicted that improving the customer experience will be even more important than improving revenues for companies in 2015 therefore this theme is taking on a new significance.

The director of Internet Solutions at IBA, Aliaksei Minkevich, was also speaking. He described some case studies and drove home the real importance of thinking about technology projects and how they can improve the way a business uses data. Aliaksei was particularly focused on describing how a technology solution is no longer as simple as it used to be. Much of the business benefit from processes and systems today comes from the opportunities to use information in a smarter way, rather than just reducing cost or aiming for efficiency.

I started talking about the connection – as I see it – between modern day CRM and Big Data. The way customers interact with companies in all industries has changed in the past decade and this wider social change in how people communicate has to be appreciated by corporate executives.

The two big drivers of this change were the launch of the iPhone in 2007 and the explosion in the use of social networks from 2008 – both very recent dates. Of course it was possible to use the mobile Internet before the iPhone, but Apple made it so much easier and easy access became the expectation from consumers.

And, of course, people were using social networks prior to 2008, but this was when it really went mainstream. Facebook started maturing and Twitter became commonly mentioned in broadcast media, such as radio and TV. 2008 was really the tipping point when social networks became normal for everyone.

These developments have changed the way customers interact with companies. It is now fairly normal for any customer to use at least six different channels when interacting with brands – email, voice, chat, Facebook, Twitter, and review or rating websites like Tripadvisor. There are more and this changes all the time, but this is already a very different environment when compared to those days before social networks and the mobile Internet were common.

So companies should no longer be exploring how to improve customer service as an activity, they need to be working harder at Customer Relationship Management – back to CRM again. This is because the real measure of success with customers in this multichannel environment is the quality of the engagement between the brand and the customer.

Getting this right demands the use of some serious technology. Running a customer service team no longer means just answering the phone, it needs data analysts, knowledge of Big Data, and a CRM system that allows the customer to engage and enjoy interacting with the brand.

Companies that can deliver this kind of technology in a way that improves the experience of your customers are going to lead the way. Tech players will become customer service experts as the use of technology underpins how companies interact with their customers.

Underneath all this remains the fact that how we all communicate has changed. If you want any executive to understand why this is important, then just ask them about the last time they needed to select a politician to vote for, a restaurant to eat in, or a hotel to stay in. If all these decisions are now being shaped by data, then don’t you think that the relationship between your own customers and your company are also about to be shaped the same way?

 

Big Data and CRM

We have it all in this London event featuring international speakers

It’s good to explore the future. At IBA we are always looked ahead to what is coming next, this is one of the reasons why we host this blog. It’s also why we have arranged an exciting event in London titled “The Big Picture on Big Data and Customer Relationships: Case Studies and Thoughts for the Future.

We have three great speakers lined up for the event.

Mark Hillary is an IT director who became a writer. His most recent book explores the subject of CEOs who blog, but he has also written about outsourcing and the globalisation of services. Mark is based in Brazil. Mark will talk about how Big Data and the analysis of customer information is changing the way companies are structured.

Peter Ryan is a principal analyst at Ovum. He is one of the best-known global analysts focused on customer service and experience. Peter is based in Canada. Peter will talk about the way that CRM is changing customer interactions and how companies relate to customers.

Aliaksei Minkevich, the director of our Internet Solutions Division will present some case studies of our own work in this area. Aliaksei is based in Belarus.

All three speakers are travelling to London to share their ideas and we are thrilled to host this event. It will take place on November 27 at the Institute of Directors in London.

Could Big Data help to prevent the spread of Ebola?

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

I’ve written about Big Data in several blogs here. What it is. How it can be defined. And even how it can be used, but there are two additional factors that really help with any understanding of how Big Data fits into the modern organisation.
How do you make it work – what tools are needed to move from just having a large amount of data available to being able to gain insights from that data?

Do I have the kind of data that I can get insights from? What kind of insights am I expecting from the information that I have?
I have added two links to recent news stories that can elaborate further on these questions.

It is no use to anyone if you just have an enormous amount of data, but no tools to analyse it with. You can’t engage with Big Data using an Excel sheet. The volumes involved are often enormous and far more than what you could load into a computer to be studied as a single block of information.

So this is one of the first issues to address, and it may be where an expert partner can help the most. Is your data available? What tools can you use to collect together all that structured and unstructured data, and how can you even start to analyse it?
Now, what are the kinds of insights you can find? It depends on your business and the type of data available, but with Big Data you can uncover all kinds of relationships between variables that were not visible without the analysis.

This example of how Big Data is helping to predict where Ebola will strike next is a great example. It is just taking information we already have such as infections, locations of hospitals, number of doctors and so on, but using past knowledge and these factors to make predictions. Now imagine if you could start applying these insights in your business?

Making Big Data work with the right tools and determining the type of insight you need are two important factors in planning how you can make it work for you.

Will a Skills Shortage Threaten the Future of Big Data?

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

As the economy develops, old jobs vanish and new ones are created. This process has always taken place as technology creates new needs and old skills are replaced. Just consider how important the blacksmith used to be before cars were commonly used and if someone described themselves as a blogger or flash developer in 1985 it would have made no sense – times change.

Big Data is another of these major changes. Not just in the sense that we are becoming able to analyse larger sets of data thanks to the technology becoming faster and more powerful – especially with more memory being available, but because the ability to do this work is now a skill itself. Understanding Big Data and being able to manipulate and analyse large sets of data is a popular skill to be exploring now as every analyst predicts that Big Data use is set to explode in the coming years.

The analyst firm IDC wrote a study in 2012 that predicted the amount of data available to analyse would increase 50 times by 2020. This prediction remains true – if anything it may be even more by 2020 as new applications that create data are launched all the time – from smart watches to other wearable technologies.

All this has led to a fear that there will not be enough people available to work on Big Data projects. McKinsey believes that the US will need almost 200,000 new data scientists by 2018 and the British Royal Academy of Engineering has predicted a need for 1.25 million graduates in science and technology subjects by 2020.

A recent column in the British ‘Daily Telegraph’ claimed that this shortfall in data scientists might even be a threat to the future of business. But what all these concerns in the UK and US often fail to acknowledge is that there are many other countries with an abundance of data scientists.
Offshore outsourcing has been long proven as a strategy for software development and other IT requirements. It will be exactly the same once data science becomes a mainstream part of every business. And companies like IBA Group are already doing it today.

Understanding Big Data

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

Big Data is a subject we have explored often on this blog because it’s an area where IBA has extensive experience and knowledge, but it is often difficult to explain. How big does a database need to be before it can be considered ‘Big Data’ and why do we need this separate terminology to refer to manipulating and analysing this data when relational databases have been in use for decades?

One example that goes a long way to answering these questions is the way that customer service is changing – especially for retailers. Products used to have a phone number and email address that customers could use to reach the manufacturer or retailer – usually to complain after a purchase.

Now, customers use online forums, review sites, Twitter, Facebook as well as the more traditional and direct channels such as online chat, emails, or a voice call. Customers are not always directly contacting a brand when they comment on a product, yet they usually expect a response.

Exploring this mass of information is a classic Big Data example. The retailers want to connect together all these communication channels into an ‘omnichannel’, yet this is impossible when they are considered to be regular databases.

If a customer emails a complaint, then tweets about the problem because their email is not answered and then finally calls because neither tweet nor email has been answered then the ideal situation for a retailer is that the agent on the phone knows about the earlier email and tweet.

But to make this work is not easy. The company has no control over Facebook or Twitter – it’s not internal data. And how can comments on a tweet be connected to a customer on the telephone?

All this is feasible, if you have enough information from various sources and you can analyse it quickly enough. Every company that interacts with their customers is now exploring this problem so maybe Big Data is about to hit the headlines again.

Big Data and Cloud in decision-making

IBA Group
Aleš Hojka, CEO of IBA CZ
Vitězslav Košina, Business Consultant at IBA CZ

It is a reality today that organizations have to deal with a multitude of unstructured documents and other data. These data have true value, if they are properly and timely processed and extracted, and also are supplied with really useful links.

Almost any business has in some way implemented a data management system (DMS), a content management system (CMS) or a business intelligence (BI) solution. Unfortunately, a new system often provides a very low added value, especially when a large amount of data is involved. Getting reasonable output from unstructured data is problematic. Why is it so?

DMS, CMS, and BI systems can be really effective, if they meet two essential requirements. The first is a sufficiently flexible environment and quick access to information complemented by strong information security. A really flexible environment shoul be able to respond to resource and computing requests in a very short, practically in real time. This can be easily achieved by using a cloud-based solution. As these requests are dynamic and cannot be easily predicted at the time when the system is designed, cloud can be very instrumental. In addition, keeping resources for a «rainy day» is not an effective allocation of resources.

Therefore, cloud is a prerequisite for dealing with big data, but it is not the only one. In some cases, data and documents are not available anytime and anywhere without limitations, though we have an environment designed for large amounts of data. This is true.

It should be noted that effective decision-making involves an increasingly growing amount of information. As the information should be available on mobile phones and tablets, an information management system cannot transfer huge amounts of data and should have short response time. If we meet these two basic requirements, then we are poised for truly efficient extraction and processing of large amounts of data, which can be further aggregated and analyzed to make a grounded decision, deal, and etc.

For many companies, using Software as a Service (SaaS0 is a problem, because they have to do with sensitive commercial information or client data. From the perspective of a cloud-based solution, a dedicated cloud is needed as apposed to shared capacities.

Many organizations outsource only the infrastructure, while we recommend to outsource the entire solution. With a cloud solution, the issue of security is solved to the extent that is normal for corporate clients. In this case, only the needed capacity is commissioned and there is no need to reserve resources for the team that takes care of the infrastructure and applications. The organization can thus focus on business and management objectives, as well as provide added value to the clients.

With mobile devices, security is a very thorny issue because attacks on their security are more likely than on the computers that are located in the company’s premises, where they are protected physically. The good news is that these devices are so powerful that allow for implementing the strongest encryption and other elements of modern security.

Taking into account the links between documents and their associated metadata, as well as other data sources, cloud computing is the best solution one can choose. It is however possible, if needed, to move from SaaS to the model, in which the solution is managed by the customer and yet not loses the flexibility that cloud offers us in terms of resources. Using cloud is much cheaper than building one‘s own infrastructure. Moreover, it enables organizations to concentrate on their requirements and business needs instead of specific software or infrastructure.

Internet of Things

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

I have written recently about Business Analytics (BA). What is BA? How does it affect your IT strategy and your business in general? I have also observed that there is a relationship between BA and Big Data (BD) – they are related concepts.

To clear up any confusion, I would say that BA is related to taking a set of data, performing a modelling operation, and using the model to predict some kind of future state – what-if calculations. BD is more of a continuous analysis of very large-scale business information.

But the business concept that is driving forward the importance of both Business Analytics and Big Data is really The Internet of Things (IoT).

Even for a fairly short blog post, this is already starting to fill up with three-letter-acronyms so let’s define what the IoT really is. More and more devices are capable of communication using the existing Internet infrastructure. It used to be computers that we would connect to the Internet, then laptops, then smart phones. Now it is tablets, ebooks, televisions, and every corporate electronic system you can think of – from security systems to electricity meters to photocopiers.

This revolution in making almost every device connect to the Internet is the starting point for the IoT. The classic consumer example is usually the connected fridge that can recommend a dinner based on what is inside, though a more useful example might be your car diagnosing a problem and communicating with the service centre without your own interaction.

In 1999, about 250mb of data per person was created each year. By 2012 ten times this amount of data per person was being generated. Data creation is increasing and the speed of increase is accelerating. Every day people are generating data with their smart phones without doing anything – just by switching it on, connecting to the Internet and allowing applications to work in the background.

This change in both the consumer and corporate environment is driving both the need for continuous Big Data analysis and also the ability to predict what may happen next based on Business Analytic tools.

How is Business Analytics Used in the Real World?

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

As I have mentioned in the last couple of blogs Business Analytics (BA) is about using data and models to make better decisions. This can help governments to improve policymaking and companies to develop better strategies. The aim is to use information to improve the day-to-day performance of the organisation.

But what are the real business decisions being taken with BA tools and how does the data analysis process improve the decisions?

    – In the airline business, employees and aircraft need to be in the right place at the right time to maximise efficiency. This is a complex planning procedure when things are going right, but when a flight is delayed or a key staff member is ill or a plane requires unscheduled maintenance then the knock-on effect can be huge. Analyzing the possible options is a great example of how BA can influence real decisions.
    – Hotels want guests in their rooms as often as possible. Empty rooms in a hotel mean lost profit and a hotel that quickly sells out a particular night may have been able to charge more for the rooms on that evening. Analyzing past customer behaviour, the competition, and other influencing factors such as big sport or music events in the neighbourhood is another classic example of how data can feed into a specific business decision – how much to charge for a room.
    – Banks and finance companies need to make quick decisions about whether to lend money to a particular customer based on limited information – such as the salary. However there are many other factors that could determine whether the individual is good for the loan or not and these can all be quickly factored together to provide a decision.
    – Supermarkets always seem to have full shelves these days. Can you remember Saturday afternoons where many big supermarkets would run out of important products? With the entire history of each product and how it sells in each store it is now far easier for supermarket managers to ensure they are ordering the correct stock levels.

These are just four entirely different industries, but in each one it is clear that Business Analytic tools are changing how managers make decisions in those companies.

Better decision-making leads to increased efficiency, a better use of existing resources, and the opportunity to perform better – to earn more by delivering a better service. For this reason, managers in all industries should be thinking about what Business Analytics can do for them.

Selecting the Right Business Analytics Partner

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

IDC is one of the leading global industry analysts, so it’s always interesting to see their own guidance on choosing a supplier. Their recent report ‘IDC MarketScape Excerpt: Worldwide Business Analytics Consulting and Systems Integration Services 2014 Vendor Assessment’ focused exclusively on the questions you need to ask when searching for a Business Analytics partner.

1. Pay attention to domain knowledge. Over the years, some service providers have built deep industry expertise across certain business needs.

2. Create a culture of analytics. It is not enough for you to have access to the right data, you need to create the processes that can make use of this data across your entire organization.

3. Don’t neglect the basics. Companies often find they have data issues once the migration has commenced, which will then delay the entire migration project. Stop and avoid all these roadblocks by taking the data cleansing stage seriously so the migration can run smoothly.

4. Align the strength of your supplier with project success. If you find a good match then ensure that your partner gets stronger as the project succeeds.

Of course, point 5 from IDC was to utilize their own research when selecting a supplier. Most of these points are what any manager with a good experience of outsourcing would be planning anyway, but it cannot be stressed enough that good planning for the migration and creating a culture of data analytics are essential for success.

Business Analytics and Big Data

IBA Group
Mark Hillary

Business Analytics is a topic that is often confused with Big Data. While the analysis of Big Data is related to the continuous analysis of business information through an analytical process, they are related concepts rather than exactly the same thing.

There are various kinds of analytics to start with:

Descriptive Analytics: how to gain insight from historical data, creating reports and scorecards that give a better vision of some existing data.

Predictive analytics: modeling through the use of predictive models and machine learning – allowing the system to learn what might happen next based on the data that is being studied usually in real-time.

Prescriptive analytics: taking a large data-set and attempting to create decisions, choosing possible paths, simulating what might happen if certain decisions are taken.

Decisive analytics: this supports human decision-making with very visual analytic information that helps the user.

So the field of Business Analytics is more related to the process of taking data and either modeling outcomes or predicting what may happen next, rather than just attempting to spot trends in a large data set.

Business Analytics is really a tool that can support executives to make better decisions by supporting their decisions with data, rather than just estimates or guesses. By using actual data from the business and modeling potential outcomes based on decisions that could be taken, the data can help to support the direction a business leader should take.

This type of process has existed for a long time, but it has been the creation of vast pools of business data – the move towards a Big Data environment – that has really stimulated the need for improved Business Analytics. The increased amount of data has provided more information that can be analysed and yet has also made it more difficult to reach a conclusion on the right decisions – without better analysis.